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Looking at Polaris Sleds- advice?

Discussion in 'General ATV/Quad Discussion' started by DieselFume, Jan 2, 2019.

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  1. DieselFume

    DieselFume Adam Moderator

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    2013 XP 800 Ranger, Three 2017 Polaris 570 Full Sizes. All subjected to hard ranch work, long hours and rough conditions. 5 years or bust!

    Going to look at a pair of Polaris Sleds here tomorrow.

    I know there really isn't a place for this discussion, but thought you guys wouldn't mind if I throw it out there.

    Haven't had a Sled on this place since the '84 polaris 440 left, and the last two hard winters had got us thinking about it.

    A friend of mine inherited an early 90s polaris indy 500, and a late 90s 700 (note sure if it's an RMK or Indy).

    The 500 is supposed to be a low mile mint sled, the 700 is supposed to be good, but needs a windshield and has a crack in the seat... Both are good runners. He's only asking $700 for the pair, but no titles.

    Going to go look at them tomorrow morning, and most likely take them home. From what I can tell both the 500 and 700 were pretty solid engines. Figured a couple of you Michiganites would probably know much more about them than I do!

    Any thing in particular I should look/watchout for? This is a pretty new venture for this dumb country boy!

    My biggest concern at this point is that the big 700 sled is 100 lbs heaver than the 500, and has 40 more hp.... I could kill myself.
     
  2. Jaybey

    Jaybey Joe SXS Nation Expert

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    Adam, I know nothing about sleds, however, I know many of us on the forums and we need to know our own limitation. Please be careful.
     
  3. Seastacker

    Seastacker Carl Moderator

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    2019 Polaris General 4

    I used to ride all Arctic Cat sleds, so I am no Polaris sled expert (other than the fact I know my ZR stomped all over most of the Polaris sleds I came across :) ). I do know that Indy 500 is a great, reliable machine. Being 2 strokes I would check compression to be sure the engines are solid. Unless you know how long they have set, I would plan on flushing the tanks out and starting with fresh fuel. Take a look at the tracks and skid frames to be sure there is no sign of torn rubber, ripped out studs, worn thru track clips etc. Be sure the skid frames look solid, no missing idler wheels, broken parts, etc. Common wear parts are the ski wear bars and the skid frame hyfax (plastic wear strips the tracks ride on). I'm sure I will come up with more as I think about it. $700 seems like a good deal assuming you don't have to put a ton of money into them.
     
  4. Pede

    Pede SXS Nation Team Leader

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    Loved snowmobiling, sadly I've been out of it since the late 80's. My last sled was a 1980 500 leaf sprung that could have gotten me in a lot of trouble, 104mph was the fastest I've ever been, but my ex's little TXL340 liquid won more trophies then I did. The Indy's had just come on the market when I bought my brand new 500 in 1983. Carl has sound advice and I might add look at the cooling fins, if they still had them, under the foot holds or in the front center of the track. I will add those motors were fairly easy to refresh the top end and the bottoms were pretty bullet proof. Clutches shouldn't be a problem for you.
     
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  5. Seastacker

    Seastacker Carl Moderator

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    2019 Polaris General 4

    The good news is with these is that parts should be pretty cheap and easy to come by. All the wear parts including idler wheels and bearings in the skids are very cost effective in the aftermarket. It would be good to not have to do any major mechanical, but as @Pede stated, these 2 strokes are a breeze to rebuild most of the time. The only things that get costly with the motors are cranks and if the cylinders are chrome/nikasil coated and it’s damaged. I don’t know if Polaris did this or not. A simple compression test can usually give you an idea if the motors are solid or not.
     
  6. DieselFume

    DieselFume Adam Moderator

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    2013 XP 800 Ranger, Three 2017 Polaris 570 Full Sizes. All subjected to hard ranch work, long hours and rough conditions. 5 years or bust!

    Well, Here they are.

    Had them a couple weeks now, No snow to ride on. Rode them very little when I brought them home. Cleaned the carbs quick, threw in some fresh gas and both fired and run GOOD. The 700 is spooky fast, and sounds like a stock car sitting there idling. The 500 is in better shape, is a SKS model and will probably be the one I keep if I do sell one. The 500 needs some carb work still, it seems to wet the plugs idling, and bog out (has a hard time revving to take off when fully warmed up).

    Both sleds have about 3500 miles on them, not low by any means, but not high either. The 700s track is a little more beat up, but is also studded. The 500 has a 2" paddle track, and it is in VERY good shape. Just a better sled all the way around.

    I'm thinking as cheap as I got them, I may keep them both, the 700 would make a great backup if I grenade one of them. I couldn't replace one for $350 and get a running sled. like these are.

    One thing I don't like about them is the weight. Both weigh in the 500 lb range, and could get a guy seriously hurt if stupid enough. We have an old 79 JD spitfire sled (my dads) that we got running here last week, it's got a 340 kohler that's an animal. sled weighs about 270 lbs. it's pretty neat. Now just need some snow!

    20190103_14.jpg 20190103_15.jpg
     
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  7. Pede

    Pede SXS Nation Team Leader

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    They got Mikuni slide valve carbs right? guessing the wrong jets or center needle is set wrong, colder weather will lean it down, is the air box gutted?
     
  8. Seastacker

    Seastacker Carl Moderator

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    2019 Polaris General 4

    NIce! I think you got a steal of a deal on those things! I bet that 700 is an animal. On the 500, be sure to check compression and the base air screw setting. Low compression can cause it to load up. Also, check the jetting to be sure they are 1) the correct size per the manual/ microfiche and 2) someone did not hog them out while cleaning. I would also check the needle position which is adjustable. If someone got crazy in the carbs, they can throw all sort of stuff off. When I have one I cant get right, I typically will just get new jets which are cheap and start from scratch.

    I will look around in my phone and see if I can find some pics of my old ZR600 to share.
     
  9. Seastacker

    Seastacker Carl Moderator

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    @Pede, I think we were typing at the same time on the tuning tips, lol.

    Here are my old machines. 1986 Yamaha Enticer 340. 1998 Arctic Cat ZR600 EFI. The ZR was built up pretty good for some aggressive trail use. I will admit, despite the big power of the ZR, the little Yami was more fun sometimes. The super light sled and peppy 340 twin was a riot. I had a few other sleds in the past I don't have pictures of....
    Arctic Cat El Tigre and Arctic Cat Pantera, both late 70's to early 80's. My first sled was a 1972 Yamaha SL338. I was probably 12 years old. It was my first big project as a kid. I had that thing fixed up nice. I never did get it running right. I wish I had it back now knowing what I know. I guarantee it would be a nice little vintage lake runner.

    4D6D8BB6-448B-475E-ADD9-381B08734519.jpeg E77F1FA9-1127-4066-954B-84FD3C298DC4.jpeg 76201AE1-7A3C-44E2-B700-B5309421ACE4.jpeg 68A09046-CA7D-4E0A-A8DE-4EC1B3314856.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2019
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  10. DieselFume

    DieselFume Adam Moderator

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    2013 XP 800 Ranger, Three 2017 Polaris 570 Full Sizes. All subjected to hard ranch work, long hours and rough conditions. 5 years or bust!

    The 500 has Mikuni Carbs, yes. Had them both off, they were gummed up a little from the 1 yo gas that both sleds had in them.

    The 500 run/pulls like an animal, but when full hot at idle, it tries (and will) die out. Also doesn't want to rev up and go, like it's overheating. But, the day I was using it, it was 40 degrees, and probably not enough snow to throw up on the coolers under the steps.. When I cleaned the carbs I did check the jets, and it is jetted correctly. Even confirmed with my polaris mechanic friend at the dealer. He did a compression check for me by feel (pulling the rope slow, he's been around them a long time) and said the compression felt really good. However I have not checked with a gauge yet.

    The one thing I didn't do was remove the needles/seats. I would have had to take about 15 minutes more and drive out the pins that held the float arm in place, so just flushed it quick with brake cleaner to get it up and running. A mistake on my part. I think I'll take them off again, and polish/replace the needles/seats and see if that fixes it... I could be flooding out at idle.
     
  11. Seastacker

    Seastacker Carl Moderator

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    2019 Polaris General 4

    The throttle needle is actually what I was referring to (#6). These typically have 5 grooves for adjustment. If the rest of the machine is stock inc the carb jets, I imagine no one would have messed with these. These come into play for more advanced tuning usually. None the less, something to check and have a baseline on.
    A lot of people typically don't know there is also a needle jet in there (#9). It will come out after you pull the main jet out. It will come out the top. I always pull these to get the deepest clean I can.
    The needle and seat is not bad to check either. The pins will usually slide out pretty easy once you get them started. A leaking needle will certainly cause issues. Sometimes these are rubber tipped and can deteriorate and wear. Good call to check them as part of a holistic carb check.
    Hopefully your Polaris buddy can get you a good baseline on the air screw and this circuit in the carb is good and clean.

    upload_2019-1-18_15-10-2.png
     
  12. Pede

    Pede SXS Nation Team Leader

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    They don't like hot, get a gauge on it and don't rely on an idiot light. Check the clutches yet? these wear worse then the rangers. And since were feeling nostalgic, anyone ever seen one of these, twin track and it was my first sled.

    eagle.jpg
     
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  13. Seastacker

    Seastacker Carl Moderator

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    Never on the trail. I did see one at the snow show one year. Very cool!
     
  14. DieselFume

    DieselFume Adam Moderator

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    2013 XP 800 Ranger, Three 2017 Polaris 570 Full Sizes. All subjected to hard ranch work, long hours and rough conditions. 5 years or bust!

    That's a sweet sled! We got my dad's old JD spitfire running (air cooled Kohlor 340) last week, so if it snows again we're gonna try and run it around.

    I wondered about the idiot light, I should test it to see if it even works.

    Why/how are the clutches going to wear more on a sled? no dirt/dust. Both these sleds have about 3000 miles on them, and now you've got me worried they need buttons and rollers!
     
  15. Pede

    Pede SXS Nation Team Leader

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    Yeah but your dealing with an open system and a lot more moisture, and at least for me, a lot more throttle then I do with the ranger. I cam close to buying a indy once when we were up north, to bad it was 30below or I would have went back and got it, there are cheaper in snow country. Below is the last new sled I bought, 1980 off the showroom floor in 1983. Carl you'll appreciate this, use to bump heads with a lot of 6000. Generic pic, not actual.

    centurion.jpg
     
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